Double Victories for CashCall!

The CashCall Mortgage Cycling Team has wrapped up yet another successful weekend of racing in Southern California.

The first win of the weekend came from climber extraordinaire, Stefano Barberi. He made the trek to Lone Pine, CA for the Mt. Whitney Stage Race where he handedly won stage 1. This stage only traveled a mere 29 miles, however during that span of pavement it climbed a whopping 7,100 feet. Not mention, this event is at a much higher altitude than Stefano is used to training at! Day 2 brought another 29 mile event which climbed 6,00ft. Stefano again showed his climbing strength as he won this stage and overall victory.

At home, four riders congregated in Dominguez Hills for SoCalCup race #8, CBR Razor’s Edge Criterium. Devan Dunn, Lee Muse, David Santos and Brian McCulloch were primed and ready for the event despite the high temperatures and increasing speeds of the wind.

Pre-race meeting with Director Paul Abrahams. Photo Credit: Danny Munson.

Brian McCulloch won the event, with teammate David Santos placing 2nd and Devan Dunn sprinting to narrowly miss 3rd place and finish 4th. Our friends at Cycling Illustrated had Brian do a race report on their website. It is a great read and you can check it out HERE.

Brian McCulloch in the early race breakaway that was initiated lap 1, turn 1! Photo Credit: Danny Munson.

Devan Dunn and David Santos patrolling the chase group. Photo Credit: Danny Munson.

The break was caught and Brian McCulloch and David Santos attacked yet again, creating the final break of the race. Photo Credit: Danny Munson.

Breakaway partners Brian McCulloch and David Santos go 1-2! Photo Credit: Danny Munson.

 

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Ontario Summer’s End Grand Prix: CashCall goes 1-2!

Lee Muse finished 2nd at the Ontario Summer’s End Grand Prix and he recounted the day’s efforts below. Thank you Lee!

With the road cycling season winding down, you never know what you will get when you show up to a local race. This final edition of the Ontario Series, the Summer End Grand Prix, took place in 105 degree heat, with a stiff crosswind coming down the long finishing straight. All the CashCall Mortgage Cycling Team boys were there and motivated to ride hard.

Devan Dunn on the attack with Justin Williams on his wheel. Photo Credit: Danny Munson.

In our pre-race meeting, we laid out the plan for the day. I remember Devan Dunn mentioned hitting it hard from the start. I wasn’t sure if he was serious or not, but I got my answer when the gun went off. Not one minute into the race and Devan is on the front throwing down some ridiculous power. My heart rate hit 180bpm before the first lap was complete…and that pretty much where it stayed for the next 30 minutes. The attacks were absolutely relentless. We wanted to blow the field apart and make everyone suffer in the intense heat. Dave Santos was finally able to successfully breakaway with a few other riders, which gave myself, Devan, Brian McCulloch, Justin Williams, and Stefano Barberi a little bit of a breather as we let the rest of the field do the chasing. Dave eventually was brought back, but not before nabbing some nifty primes along the way.

David Santos initiated the first break of many on the day. Photo Credit: Danny Munson. Read more

Ladera Ranch Grand Prix: Podium Finish!

David Santos on the narrow and fast course. Photo Credit: Danny Munson

Ladera Ranch Grand Prix is a season favorite of the CashCall Mortgage Cycling Team. The course is narrow and fast, nestled in the model-community of Ladera Ranch, CA. The week leading into the race boasted some of the highest temperatures of the summer so far, surpassing the 110F mark on many occasions. Fortunately, the Pro 1/2 men’s race was at 4:30pm when the temperatures had dropped and the wind picked up.

The full CashCall team was at the race, keeping it animated from the start. Attack after attack went up the road, however no moves lasted longer than 3 laps. On this course, you can quickly get out of sight of the peloton, but with motivated solo riders and teams missing the moves, a sprint finish was destined to happen.

Lee Muse on the attack heading into the start/finish area. Photo Credit: Danny Munson

 

Devan Dunn in the bunch under the race banner. Photo Credit: Danny Munson Read more

Devan Dunn WINS Fast and Furious Criterium!

Saturday August 4th, the riders loaded into the team van for one last road trip. Justin Williams, Devan Dunn, Stefano Barberi, and Brian McCulluch met teammate Wes Holloway in Pleasanton, CA for a day with sponsor Jakroo Custom Cycling Apparel and the Fast and Furious Criterium the following day.

The race eventually unfolded with Devan Dunn winning for the second week in a row, and teammate Justin Williams finishing a solid 3rd. Justin, Wes, and Devan chime in on how the race unfolded.

Devan Dunn winning Fast and Furious Criterium ahead of Chuck Hutchenson (Strava). Photo Credit: Dale Tapley Photography Read more

Brentwood Grand Prix Report

Brentwood Grand Prix is one of the most exciting courses and venues put on in the SoCal region. With high numbers of spectators and a course that begins with turn one being a hairpin, the race is always exciting. It is not a traditional flat criterium. Over the 6-turn course, the riders had a nice descending turn to contend with and an uphill dig into the 6th and final turn before heading into the finish straight away. Read more

Amazing Story: Mt. McKinley Summit by sponsor Gary Rennie

Gary Rennie of Rennie and Associates, is a long time friend of the team and has been a key sponsor of the CashCall Mortgage Cycling Team since its beginning. This past spring, he traveled to Alaska for an amazing adventure, to climb Mount McKinley. Here is his recount of the amazing experience. Thank you Gary for all your support of the team and for sharing your adventure with us!

My McKinley Adventure – A Category 2.8

When you are on North America’s highest mountain for 23 days, you find a lot of time to solve the world’s problems, list things you would bring to a desert island, and put all things into obscure categories. For example, while we were on the mountain my climbing team and I decided that all adventures generally fall into one of three categories:

1. A “one” is an adventure where you acknowledge very shortly after finishing (hours), with everyone involved, that you enjoyed it and would do it again.

2. A “two” requires several weeks, or perhaps months, to acknowledge that you had some fun, and furthermore that you might consider doing something similar in the next decade.

3. A “three,” however, is an experience that leaves participants wondering if they will ever acknowledge any parts that were enjoyable. Generally, one would never consider trying such a foolish endeavor again.

One month after returning from summiting Mt. McKinley, I’m at a 2.8. Every day that goes by the figure drops by a bit, but I don’t think it will ever, ever, drop below a solid 2.

Climbing Denali was quite easily the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. Not so physically, for which I was quite prepared having followed a rigorous workout regimen for a year beforehand, but rather the combined effects of physical exhaustion, mental fatigue, cold, altitude, and isolation. I don’t know how one prepares for this brutal combination. However, I do believe that the uncertainty surrounding how one will cope with these multiple stressors is an important component of the attraction to the sport of climbing itself.

Mt. McKinley, or Denali as it was named before contemporary exploration of Alaska’s interior, is located about 3 hours drive northeast from Anchorage, Alaska. At 20,320’ above sea level, it is North America’s highest point. It was first summited in 1913. In the 99 years since, less than 20,000 people have summited McKinley. Unfortunately, more than 100 have died trying. Four died while I was on the mountain, another the week before. Roughly 1,000 climbers attempt the mountain each year. The success rate averages 40%.

Glaciers cover McKinley year-round. The glaciers are constantly sliding down the mountain, causing large crevasses to form as ice slides over rock far below. The crevasses are often tens of feet wide and hundreds of feet deep. They are one of the primary risks climbers face as they slowly work their way up the glaciers to the summit.

Weather is another primary risk. McKinley’s weather is notoriously brutal, with summit temperatures routinely reaching -60o F. The climbing season is short, typically mid-May through mid-July.

The team before takeoff (guides kneeling on right). Read more